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Can We Feed Our Babies Better to Prevent Allergies?

Tuesday, May 15, 7-9 p.m.

IIC-2001, Bruneau Centre for Research and Innovation

An infant’s immune system develops early in life and one of the most important functions is the ability to learn how to ‘tolerate’ foods in their diet.

Failure to develop immune tolerance results in in food allergies. There is an increasing incidence of food related allergies in infants and the diet is likely one of the causes. Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing allergies, but recent studies have suggested that there are foods and nutrients that mom can eat while breast feeding that can improve immune tolerance and even further reduce the chance that her child will develop a food allergy.

Dr. Catherine Field, a professor in the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Science, University of Alberta will give the fourth annual Faith Elizabeth Winifred (Rusted) Bayley Public Lecture. She will present new recommendations and research that provides evidence that we can feed our babies better to prevent food allergies.

Dr. Field currently serves on the International Life Science Board of Trustees, is an associate editor for the American Society for Nutrition review journal Advances in Nutrition and is the current VP and incoming president of the American Society for Nutrition. She is co-PI for the large maternal infant cohort Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON).

Presented by Department of Biochemistry

Event Listing 2018-05-15 19:00:00 2018-05-15 21:00:00 America/St_Johns Can We Feed Our Babies Better to Prevent Allergies? An infant’s immune system develops early in life and one of the most important functions is the ability to learn how to ‘tolerate’ foods in their diet. Failure to develop immune tolerance results in in food allergies. There is an increasing incidence of food related allergies in infants and the diet is likely one of the causes. Breast feeding reduces the risk of developing allergies, but recent studies have suggested that there are foods and nutrients that mom can eat while breast feeding that can improve immune tolerance and even further reduce the chance that her child will develop a food allergy. Dr. Catherine Field, a professor in the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Science, University of Alberta will give the fourth annual Faith Elizabeth Winifred (Rusted) Bayley Public Lecture. She will present new recommendations and research that provides evidence that we can feed our babies better to prevent food allergies. Dr. Field currently serves on the International Life Science Board of Trustees, is an associate editor for the American Society for Nutrition review journal Advances in Nutrition and is the current VP and incoming president of the American Society for Nutrition. She is co-PI for the large maternal infant cohort Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON). IIC-2001, Bruneau Centre for Research and Innovation Department of Biochemistry