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Ecological Inertia Slows Tree Species’ Responses to Climate Change, or Lichens and Voles and Weevils, Oh My!

Friday, Oct. 13, 4-5 p.m.

SN-2067

Dr. Carissa Brown will speak on “Ecological inertia slows tree species’ responses to climate change. Or: Lichens and voles and weevils, oh my!” It is becoming increasingly apparent that non-climatic factors (e.g., seed predation, soil characteristics) play an important role in a species’ ability to respond to climate change. The Northern EGE Lab uses field experiments combined with natural history observations to disentangle the effects of climate change from non-climatic factors on tree species’ distributional responses to recent warming, in systems from northern Yukon to Nunatsiavut to the Avalon Peninsula.

Presented by Department of Biology, Department of Geography

Event Listing 2017-10-13 16:00:00 2017-10-13 17:00:00 America/St_Johns Ecological Inertia Slows Tree Species’ Responses to Climate Change, or Lichens and Voles and Weevils, Oh My! Dr. Carissa Brown will speak on “Ecological inertia slows tree species’ responses to climate change. Or: Lichens and voles and weevils, oh my!” It is becoming increasingly apparent that non-climatic factors (e.g., seed predation, soil characteristics) play an important role in a species’ ability to respond to climate change. The Northern EGE Lab uses field experiments combined with natural history observations to disentangle the effects of climate change from non-climatic factors on tree species’ distributional responses to recent warming, in systems from northern Yukon to Nunatsiavut to the Avalon Peninsula. SN-2067 Department of Biology, Department of Geography