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Engaging Ideas: Exploring Social Enterprise Practices that Benefit Business

Thursday, Feb. 15, 8-10 a.m.

RBC Atrium, Faculty of Business Administration

Join the Faculty of Business Administration for the next session of its research and industry engagement series, Engaging Ideas. These free, interactive presentations provide a forum for discussion between industry representatives and faculty members on the practical uses and implications of the exciting research being conducted in our faculty. The theme of this upcoming event, Exploring Social Enterprise Practices that Benefit Business, focuses on recent research and practical studies in the area of social enterprise and entrepreneurship, and discusses how these practices can contribute to better business.
ADMISSION: There is no cost to attend. Registration is required. To register, contact businessevents@mun.ca or 864-2182 by Tuesday, Feb. 13.

PRESENTATIONS:

ENABLING MILLENNIALS: THE SUCCESS OF SUCSEED
Presented by: Lynn Morrissey, assistant professor; Shaun Morrissey, M.Sc. student; Taylor Young, president, Enactus Memorial The Sucseed story captures the journey of a volunteer student team creating a sustainable social enterprise; one which has earned international recognition. The success of the project is due in large part to the dedication and passion of Memorial University students to use business as a tool to benefit society. This presentation will highlight the key principles that guided how these millennials did it, what they needed to be successful and how these principles can be applied in other settings. It will offer lessons on how employers from all sectors can enable the millennial workforce.

HOW SOCIAL ENTERPRISE BUILDS MARKETS
Presented by: Dr. John Schouten, professor Business requires healthy markets in order to exist and thrive. Social enterprise, under the right conditions, catalyzes the emergence of new markets or revitalizes existing ones. Social enterprise often taps into systemic needs of consumers and society, and cumulative acts of individual entrepreneurship can lead to robust and profitable new markets. Based on research into the history of the organic food sector, Dr. Schouten makes a case for encouraging and supporting social enterprise in Newfoundland and Labrador.

ENGAGING COMPLEXITY: LESSONS FROM THE SHOREFAST FOUNDATION
Presented by: Dr. Natalie Slawinski, associate professor Business leaders navigate increasingly complex business environments fraught with uncertainty and ambiguity. Social enterprises, which combine commercial and social goals, are particularly exposed to complexity due to the competing demands they face in trying to meet these dual goals. Using research on the Shorefast Foundation, a social enterprise on Fogo Island, Dr. Slawinski examines how organizations can better manage competing goals to adapt to rapidly changing and uncertain business environments.

Presented by Faculty of Business Administration

Event Listing 2018-02-15 8:00:00 2018-02-15 10:00:00 America/St_Johns Engaging Ideas: Exploring Social Enterprise Practices that Benefit Business Join the Faculty of Business Administration for the next session of its research and industry engagement series, Engaging Ideas. These free, interactive presentations provide a forum for discussion between industry representatives and faculty members on the practical uses and implications of the exciting research being conducted in our faculty. The theme of this upcoming event, Exploring Social Enterprise Practices that Benefit Business, focuses on recent research and practical studies in the area of social enterprise and entrepreneurship, and discusses how these practices can contribute to better business. ADMISSION: There is no cost to attend. Registration is required. To register, contact businessevents@mun.ca or 864-2182 by Tuesday, Feb. 13. PRESENTATIONS: ENABLING MILLENNIALS: THE SUCCESS OF SUCSEED Presented by: Lynn Morrissey, assistant professor; Shaun Morrissey, M.Sc. student; Taylor Young, president, Enactus Memorial The Sucseed story captures the journey of a volunteer student team creating a sustainable social enterprise; one which has earned international recognition. The success of the project is due in large part to the dedication and passion of Memorial University students to use business as a tool to benefit society. This presentation will highlight the key principles that guided how these millennials did it, what they needed to be successful and how these principles can be applied in other settings. It will offer lessons on how employers from all sectors can enable the millennial workforce. HOW SOCIAL ENTERPRISE BUILDS MARKETS Presented by: Dr. John Schouten, professor Business requires healthy markets in order to exist and thrive. Social enterprise, under the right conditions, catalyzes the emergence of new markets or revitalizes existing ones. Social enterprise often taps into systemic needs of consumers and society, and cumulative acts of individual entrepreneurship can lead to robust and profitable new markets. Based on research into the history of the organic food sector, Dr. Schouten makes a case for encouraging and supporting social enterprise in Newfoundland and Labrador. ENGAGING COMPLEXITY: LESSONS FROM THE SHOREFAST FOUNDATION Presented by: Dr. Natalie Slawinski, associate professor Business leaders navigate increasingly complex business environments fraught with uncertainty and ambiguity. Social enterprises, which combine commercial and social goals, are particularly exposed to complexity due to the competing demands they face in trying to meet these dual goals. Using research on the Shorefast Foundation, a social enterprise on Fogo Island, Dr. Slawinski examines how organizations can better manage competing goals to adapt to rapidly changing and uncertain business environments. RBC Atrium, Faculty of Business Administration Faculty of Business Administration