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Environmental Assessment and Early Dene Resistance to the Norman Wells Pipeline in the 1980s

Friday, Nov. 4, 1-2 p.m.

A-4004

History Department Seminar Series. Sean Kheraj, Department of History, York University will present. In 1980, Interprovincial Pipe Line Company applied for regulatory approval from the National Energy board to construct a small diameter oil pipeline from Norman Wells, NWT to Zama, AB. This paper will examine the assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the pipeline in 1980. Using exhibits and evidence from the initial NEB hearings on the proposal, this paper will explore the competing meanings of environmental protection and impact as IPL presented its environmental assessment report and local Dene leaders sought to challenge those findings. Sean Kheraj is an associate professor of Canadian and environmental history at York University. He is also the director and editor-in-chief of the Network in Canadian History and Environment. He is the author of Inventing Stanley Park: An Environmental History and several articles on Canadian urban environmental history. His current research examines the development and regulation of long-distance oil pipelines in Canada since 1947. For more information on his research, articles, podcasts, and other goodies, visit http://seankheraj.com.

Presented by Department of History

Event Listing 2016-11-04 13:00:00 2016-11-04 14:00:00 America/St_Johns Environmental Assessment and Early Dene Resistance to the Norman Wells Pipeline in the 1980s History Department Seminar Series. Sean Kheraj, Department of History, York University will present. In 1980, Interprovincial Pipe Line Company applied for regulatory approval from the National Energy board to construct a small diameter oil pipeline from Norman Wells, NWT to Zama, AB. This paper will examine the assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the pipeline in 1980. Using exhibits and evidence from the initial NEB hearings on the proposal, this paper will explore the competing meanings of environmental protection and impact as IPL presented its environmental assessment report and local Dene leaders sought to challenge those findings. Sean Kheraj is an associate professor of Canadian and environmental history at York University. He is also the director and editor-in-chief of the Network in Canadian History and Environment. He is the author of Inventing Stanley Park: An Environmental History and several articles on Canadian urban environmental history. His current research examines the development and regulation of long-distance oil pipelines in Canada since 1947. For more information on his research, articles, podcasts, and other goodies, visit http://seankheraj.com. A-4004 Department of History