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Evidence for the Use of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

Wednesday, May 16, 1-2 p.m.

ED-1014

Despite advances in screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, breast cancer (BC) remains the second leading cause of female cancer-related death.

High intakes of fatty fish, sources of the omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapenataenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid are associated with a lower risk of BC and feeding these fatty acids to animals prevents and reduces the growth of experimental mammary tumours and metastasis.

Dr. Catherine Field, a professor in the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Science, University of Alberta, hasĀ found that pre-treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells with DHA sensitizes these cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin (DOX).

More recently, she has confirmed this finding in dietary trials using two different drugs (DOX and docetaxel) and two different pre-clinical BC rodent models. She has also identified potential mechanisms in vitro including reducing proliferation and cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptosis. This work supports further research on the inclusion of a supplement, with minimal to no known side effects, with current neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer.

Dr. Field will present this information in a research talk as part of the Faith Elizabeth Winifred (Rusted) Bayley Lecture.

Presented by Department of Biochemistry

Event Listing 2018-05-16 13:00:00 2018-05-16 14:00:00 America/St_Johns Evidence for the Use of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in the Treatment of Breast Cancer Despite advances in screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, breast cancer (BC) remains the second leading cause of female cancer-related death. High intakes of fatty fish, sources of the omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapenataenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid are associated with a lower risk of BC and feeding these fatty acids to animals prevents and reduces the growth of experimental mammary tumours and metastasis. Dr. Catherine Field, a professor in the Faculty of Agriculture, Life and Environmental Science, University of Alberta, hasĀ found that pre-treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells with DHA sensitizes these cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin (DOX). More recently, she has confirmed this finding in dietary trials using two different drugs (DOX and docetaxel) and two different pre-clinical BC rodent models. She has also identified potential mechanisms in vitro including reducing proliferation and cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptosis. This work supports further research on the inclusion of a supplement, with minimal to no known side effects, with current neoadjuvant therapy for breast cancer. Dr. Field will present this information in a research talk as part of the Faith Elizabeth Winifred (Rusted) Bayley Lecture. ED-1014 Department of Biochemistry