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Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence in Child Marriages in Ghana

Friday, Feb. 15, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

SN-4087

The Department of Gender Studies Speakers’ Series invites you to a presentation by Harriet Amoah, Master of Gender Studies Candidate, Memorial University, titled “Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence in Child Marriages in Ghana.” The association between child marriage and intimate partner violence (IPV) is complex, but child marriage is often considered a key risk factor for experiencing IPV. Thus, studies reveal that women are at risk of experiencing IPV should they marry before the age of 18 years. However, despite the scholarly evidence of the predominance of IPV in child marriages, there is a dearth of research on the phenomenon, especially in Ghana. Most existing studies are quantitative and focus on assessing the prevalence of IPV in child marriage, whereas little is known about the lived IPV experiences of child brides. Based on this, this study used in-depth interviews to illuminate the context, the narratives and the subjective meanings Ghanaian women who married as children give to IPV, as well their experience of IPV, and what factors, according to these women, contribute to IPV.

Presented by Department of Gender Studies Speakers' Series

Event Listing 2019-02-15 12:30:00 2019-02-15 13:30:00 America/St_Johns Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence in Child Marriages in Ghana The Department of Gender Studies Speakers’ Series invites you to a presentation by Harriet Amoah, Master of Gender Studies Candidate, Memorial University, titled “Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence in Child Marriages in Ghana.” The association between child marriage and intimate partner violence (IPV) is complex, but child marriage is often considered a key risk factor for experiencing IPV. Thus, studies reveal that women are at risk of experiencing IPV should they marry before the age of 18 years. However, despite the scholarly evidence of the predominance of IPV in child marriages, there is a dearth of research on the phenomenon, especially in Ghana. Most existing studies are quantitative and focus on assessing the prevalence of IPV in child marriage, whereas little is known about the lived IPV experiences of child brides. Based on this, this study used in-depth interviews to illuminate the context, the narratives and the subjective meanings Ghanaian women who married as children give to IPV, as well their experience of IPV, and what factors, according to these women, contribute to IPV. SN-4087 Department of Gender Studies Speakers' Series