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Governments Are From Mars, Universities Are From Venus

Friday, Nov. 9, 3-4:30 p.m.

A-1046

Visiting Speaker: Michael Clair. The unprecedented rates of change in the economy, the environment, demographics and technology are creating uncertainty, worry and confusion in societies around the world. Governments are struggling to keep up with these changes and to find islands of stability amid the chaos. One of the tools that governments have in this search for stability are publicly-funded universities. Universities prepare citizens for a globalized economy that is more and more based on knowledge. Scholars and researchers come up with discoveries and innovations that help create jobs and address social challenges. And, as their name implies, universities are portals where the knowledge of humanity filters into a community or region. While there already exists a great deal of collaboration between governments and universities, the relationship between them could be greatly improved. A main reason for the relatively poor state of the relationship is the different culture that permeates both institutions, and the lack of trust that thereby emerges. This presentation will examine the two cultures in some detail and identify some practical ways in which the relationship could be improved.

Presented by Department of Economics

Event Listing 2018-11-09 15:00:00 2018-11-09 16:30:00 America/St_Johns Governments Are From Mars, Universities Are From Venus Visiting Speaker: Michael Clair. The unprecedented rates of change in the economy, the environment, demographics and technology are creating uncertainty, worry and confusion in societies around the world. Governments are struggling to keep up with these changes and to find islands of stability amid the chaos. One of the tools that governments have in this search for stability are publicly-funded universities. Universities prepare citizens for a globalized economy that is more and more based on knowledge. Scholars and researchers come up with discoveries and innovations that help create jobs and address social challenges. And, as their name implies, universities are portals where the knowledge of humanity filters into a community or region. While there already exists a great deal of collaboration between governments and universities, the relationship between them could be greatly improved. A main reason for the relatively poor state of the relationship is the different culture that permeates both institutions, and the lack of trust that thereby emerges. This presentation will examine the two cultures in some detail and identify some practical ways in which the relationship could be improved. A-1046 Department of Economics