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How to Make Zines at the End of the World: A Hands-on Workshop

Thursday, Feb. 13, 12-3 p.m.

SN-4022

When faced with bushfires, rising sea-levels, and income inequality, it can feel like the end of the world is upon us. How can the arts and social sciences respond?

This workshop will introduce participants to zines as a do-it-yourself (DIY), artistic and activist practice to address place, environments, and energy justice.

This creative, three-hour workshop is designed to give researchers, students, and community members an opportunity to learn about and experiment with zine-making as a political, environmental media practice. The workshop organizers will discuss multiple methods in DIY/alternative publishing and offer participants a hands-on provocation for new modes of making and distributing environmental humanities scholarship, drawing on the deep history of alternative publishing as a tool of environmental and social justice.

In addition to providing an introduction to zine-making as political practice, the hands-on portion of the workshop will ask participants to respond to a set of prompts about place. This could be St. John’s, a home place, or another significant site. Other themes that the workshop organizers would like to explore include environmental justice, energy, feminist and anti-colonial research methods, and climate crisis. As an open-ended, experimental workshop, the organizers encourage participants to suggest and make work responding to additional themes.

Following the workshop, the organizers will compile the visual and textual materials created by participants to produce a collaboratively-authored zine on the themes that emerged from the workshop. Digital and/or paper copies of the zine will be distributed to all the participants.

 

Call for Participants:

This workshop is designed for anyone and everyone who is interested in learning how to make zines or has been reading and publishing them for years. It’s open to students, faculty, researchers, and members of the St. John’s community and is intended for zine-makers of all levels of experience. Emphasis will be put on collaboration and skill-sharing between participants. The organizers would particularly welcome the participation of folks working on issues of climate change and systemic inequality, as well as those marginalized by mainstream publishing and research.

 

Please RSVP at rjekanowski@mun.ca by Monday, February 10th, so the organizers can estimate the size of the workshop. However, drop-ins are also welcome; no one will be turned away. 

Participants are encouraged to bring paper materials (photographs, scrap paper, drawings, etc.) that they might be interested in working with. Further zine-making materials will be provided on site.

Light refreshments (coffee, tea, muffins) will be served. Please notify the organizers of any allergies in advance.

 

About the Organizers:

Rachel Webb Jekanowski is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English at Memorial University, and community organizer with the Social Justice Cooperative of Newfoundland and Labrador. Her research straddles the environmental/energy humanities and film and media studies, investigating entanglements of visual culture, extractive industry, and environments within settler colonialism. Rachel is a relative newcomer to the zine world, having co-founded the zine series SPAM (Society, Politics, Art & Media) in summer 2018.

Emily Roehl is an energy humanities scholar and artist. She is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Transitions in Energy, Culture, and Society at the University of Alberta and co-founder of Mystery Spot Books, an artist’s book publisher based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which is producing a multi-publication project on the externalities of energy and industrial waste.

 

 

Presented by The Nexus Centre

Event Listing 2020-02-13 12:00:00 2020-02-13 15:00:00 America/St_Johns How to Make Zines at the End of the World: A Hands-on Workshop When faced with bushfires, rising sea-levels, and income inequality, it can feel like the end of the world is upon us. How can the arts and social sciences respond? This workshop will introduce participants to zines as a do-it-yourself (DIY), artistic and activist practice to address place, environments, and energy justice. This creative, three-hour workshop is designed to give researchers, students, and community members an opportunity to learn about and experiment with zine-making as a political, environmental media practice. The workshop organizers will discuss multiple methods in DIY/alternative publishing and offer participants a hands-on provocation for new modes of making and distributing environmental humanities scholarship, drawing on the deep history of alternative publishing as a tool of environmental and social justice. In addition to providing an introduction to zine-making as political practice, the hands-on portion of the workshop will ask participants to respond to a set of prompts about place. This could be St. John’s, a home place, or another significant site. Other themes that the workshop organizers would like to explore include environmental justice, energy, feminist and anti-colonial research methods, and climate crisis. As an open-ended, experimental workshop, the organizers encourage participants to suggest and make work responding to additional themes. Following the workshop, the organizers will compile the visual and textual materials created by participants to produce a collaboratively-authored zine on the themes that emerged from the workshop. Digital and/or paper copies of the zine will be distributed to all the participants.   Call for Participants: This workshop is designed for anyone and everyone who is interested in learning how to make zines or has been reading and publishing them for years. It’s open to students, faculty, researchers, and members of the St. John’s community and is intended for zine-makers of all levels of experience. Emphasis will be put on collaboration and skill-sharing between participants. The organizers would particularly welcome the participation of folks working on issues of climate change and systemic inequality, as well as those marginalized by mainstream publishing and research.   Please RSVP at rjekanowski@mun.ca by Monday, February 10th, so the organizers can estimate the size of the workshop. However, drop-ins are also welcome; no one will be turned away.  Participants are encouraged to bring paper materials (photographs, scrap paper, drawings, etc.) that they might be interested in working with. Further zine-making materials will be provided on site. Light refreshments (coffee, tea, muffins) will be served. Please notify the organizers of any allergies in advance.   About the Organizers: Rachel Webb Jekanowski is a Banting Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of English at Memorial University, and community organizer with the Social Justice Cooperative of Newfoundland and Labrador. Her research straddles the environmental/energy humanities and film and media studies, investigating entanglements of visual culture, extractive industry, and environments within settler colonialism. Rachel is a relative newcomer to the zine world, having co-founded the zine series SPAM (Society, Politics, Art & Media) in summer 2018. Emily Roehl is an energy humanities scholar and artist. She is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Transitions in Energy, Culture, and Society at the University of Alberta and co-founder of Mystery Spot Books, an artist’s book publisher based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which is producing a multi-publication project on the externalities of energy and industrial waste.     SN-4022 The Nexus Centre