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HSS on Food: Trade and the Sustainability Challenge for Global Food Governance

Thursday, Sept. 22, 7-9 p.m.

IIC-2001, Bruneau Centre for Research and Innovation

HSS on Food is a faculty-wide program, funded by the Vice-President (Academic’s) Fund for Scholarship in the Arts and the Office of Public Engagement, examining food issues through the lens of the social sciences and humanities. It is widely understood that global food security requires more sustainable food systems. At the same time, governments have pushed for greater trade liberalization in the food sector as a means to promote food security. In this context, it is important to consider how the norms of environmental sustainability and trade liberalization interact with one another in global food governance arrangements. In this talk, Jennifer Clapp, Canada Research Chair in Global Food Security and Sustainability and Professor in the School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability at the University of Waterloo, argues that trade and sustainability are often presented as mutually supportive goals in global food governance initiatives, but that the rationale for this linkage is weak on a number of fronts. She shows that despite the weaknesses of presenting these norms as mutually supportive, they continue to be linked in policy arenas for a variety of interrelated reasons.

 

Presented by Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Event Listing 2016-09-22 19:00:00 2016-09-22 21:00:00 America/St_Johns HSS on Food: Trade and the Sustainability Challenge for Global Food Governance HSS on Food is a faculty-wide program, funded by the Vice-President (Academic’s) Fund for Scholarship in the Arts and the Office of Public Engagement, examining food issues through the lens of the social sciences and humanities. It is widely understood that global food security requires more sustainable food systems. At the same time, governments have pushed for greater trade liberalization in the food sector as a means to promote food security. In this context, it is important to consider how the norms of environmental sustainability and trade liberalization interact with one another in global food governance arrangements. In this talk, Jennifer Clapp, Canada Research Chair in Global Food Security and Sustainability and Professor in the School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability at the University of Waterloo, argues that trade and sustainability are often presented as mutually supportive goals in global food governance initiatives, but that the rationale for this linkage is weak on a number of fronts. She shows that despite the weaknesses of presenting these norms as mutually supportive, they continue to be linked in policy arenas for a variety of interrelated reasons.   IIC-2001, Bruneau Centre for Research and Innovation Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences