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Masculinity in the Contemporary Newfoundland Novel

Friday, Nov. 30, 12:30-1:30 p.m.

SN-4087

The Department of Gender Studies Speakers’ Series invites you to a presentation by Mandy Rowsell, PhD Candidate, Department of English, titled “Masculinity in the Contemporary Newfoundland Novel.” Social, economic and political changes in Newfoundland have informed literary constructions of masculinity within the island’s contemporary fiction. Through a survey of contemporary Newfoundland novels my research closely examines these different representations of masculine identity in an effort to understand the various ways that strict gender roles can be potentially harmful or limiting. I look at the ways that certain novels promote a continuation of historical, hegemonic representations of men, in part through a glorification of the Newfoundland outport. I also examine how other recently published texts highlight self-destructive male characters as a possible reaction to recent changes in masculine roles on the island, a literary manifestation of the “crisis of masculinity” perceived by theorists in other contexts in the 1990s. Finally, in their presentations of queer and intersex characters I explore how some contemporary works start to gesture towards more nuanced understandings of masculinity on the island.

Presented by Department of Gender Studies Speakers' Series

Event Listing 2018-11-30 12:30:00 2018-11-30 13:30:00 America/St_Johns Masculinity in the Contemporary Newfoundland Novel The Department of Gender Studies Speakers’ Series invites you to a presentation by Mandy Rowsell, PhD Candidate, Department of English, titled “Masculinity in the Contemporary Newfoundland Novel.” Social, economic and political changes in Newfoundland have informed literary constructions of masculinity within the island’s contemporary fiction. Through a survey of contemporary Newfoundland novels my research closely examines these different representations of masculine identity in an effort to understand the various ways that strict gender roles can be potentially harmful or limiting. I look at the ways that certain novels promote a continuation of historical, hegemonic representations of men, in part through a glorification of the Newfoundland outport. I also examine how other recently published texts highlight self-destructive male characters as a possible reaction to recent changes in masculine roles on the island, a literary manifestation of the “crisis of masculinity” perceived by theorists in other contexts in the 1990s. Finally, in their presentations of queer and intersex characters I explore how some contemporary works start to gesture towards more nuanced understandings of masculinity on the island. SN-4087 Department of Gender Studies Speakers' Series