Go to page content

New Methods and New Findings: 85 Years of Archaeology in Hopedale, Labrador

Tuesday, Nov. 24, 11-11:30 a.m.

Online

The university community is invited to join Jacinda Sinclair (MA candidate, Archaeology/Supervisor Dr. Lisa Rankin) for this presentation. As an academic discipline archaeology is constantly evolving with new techniques, theories, and ethical best practices. One of the best examples of this within Newfoundland and Labrador is the research that has taken place at the 17th-18th century Inuit settlement of Avertok in what is now Hopedale, Labrador. Avertok’s name means “The Place of Whales,” and it was once among the largest and most culturally significant Inuit settlements in Labrador. The archaeology of Avertok goes back nearly a century, with its most famous excavator, Junius Bird, leading a dig in 1934 on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. In 2017, the Hopedale Community Government and the Nunatsiavut Government (NG) stated their intent to have Hopedale named Canada’s first Inuit UNESCO World Heritage Site, making our understanding of Avertok a crucial part of how Canada’s Inuit heritage is presented on the world stage. The problem, however, is that there are many questions now regarding Bird’s methodologies and the accuracy of his results. Ms. Sinclair’s research, which was part of the Tradition and Transition partnership between NG and Memorial, has sought to: (1) to provide an updated picture of Avertok that acknowledges Inuit agency in the face of European contact; and (2) to critically reassess Bird’s original excavation and its conclusions. Ms. Sinclair’s presentation will highlight the extent to which archaeology has changed since Bird’s era and how current practices encompass new challenges and opportunities. Register by emailing kathryn.lear@mun.ca.

WebEx link: https://signalhillcampus.com/researchweek20

Presented by Operations, Signal Hill Campus

Event Listing 2020-11-24 11:00:00 2020-11-24 11:30:00 America/St_Johns New Methods and New Findings: 85 Years of Archaeology in Hopedale, Labrador The university community is invited to join Jacinda Sinclair (MA candidate, Archaeology/Supervisor Dr. Lisa Rankin) for this presentation. As an academic discipline archaeology is constantly evolving with new techniques, theories, and ethical best practices. One of the best examples of this within Newfoundland and Labrador is the research that has taken place at the 17th-18th century Inuit settlement of Avertok in what is now Hopedale, Labrador. Avertok’s name means “The Place of Whales,” and it was once among the largest and most culturally significant Inuit settlements in Labrador. The archaeology of Avertok goes back nearly a century, with its most famous excavator, Junius Bird, leading a dig in 1934 on behalf of the American Museum of Natural History. In 2017, the Hopedale Community Government and the Nunatsiavut Government (NG) stated their intent to have Hopedale named Canada’s first Inuit UNESCO World Heritage Site, making our understanding of Avertok a crucial part of how Canada’s Inuit heritage is presented on the world stage. The problem, however, is that there are many questions now regarding Bird’s methodologies and the accuracy of his results. Ms. Sinclair’s research, which was part of the Tradition and Transition partnership between NG and Memorial, has sought to: (1) to provide an updated picture of Avertok that acknowledges Inuit agency in the face of European contact; and (2) to critically reassess Bird’s original excavation and its conclusions. Ms. Sinclair’s presentation will highlight the extent to which archaeology has changed since Bird’s era and how current practices encompass new challenges and opportunities. Register by emailing kathryn.lear@mun.ca. WebEx link: https://signalhillcampus.com/researchweek20 Online Operations, Signal Hill Campus