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Tagish Lake Meteorite Fall and Investigation: A Unique Messenger from the Early Solar System

Wednesday, Feb. 19, 8-9:30 p.m.

C-2045

Phil J.A. McCausland, Institute for Earth & Space Exploration, University of Western Ontario, and St. John’s Centre RASC, presents. In the predawn hour of January 18th, 2000, an exceptionally bright fireball was widely seen travelling southeast across Alaska, Yukon and northernmost B.C. The event itself was spectacular and well-recorded, but was surpassed during the subsequent winter and spring by the recovery of unique meteoritic material from the fall; in all some 10 kg of friable carbonaceous chondrite fragments were recovered from the frozen surface of Tagish Lake. Twenty years on, we can now look back on the event and put this Canadian meteorite in research perspective. http://www.stjohnsrasc.ca

Presented by St. John's Royal Astronomical Society of Canada

Event Listing 2020-02-19 20:00:00 2020-02-19 21:30:00 America/St_Johns Tagish Lake Meteorite Fall and Investigation: A Unique Messenger from the Early Solar System Phil J.A. McCausland, Institute for Earth & Space Exploration, University of Western Ontario, and St. John’s Centre RASC, presents. In the predawn hour of January 18th, 2000, an exceptionally bright fireball was widely seen travelling southeast across Alaska, Yukon and northernmost B.C. The event itself was spectacular and well-recorded, but was surpassed during the subsequent winter and spring by the recovery of unique meteoritic material from the fall; in all some 10 kg of friable carbonaceous chondrite fragments were recovered from the frozen surface of Tagish Lake. Twenty years on, we can now look back on the event and put this Canadian meteorite in research perspective. http://www.stjohnsrasc.ca C-2045 St. John's Royal Astronomical Society of Canada