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Women’s March 2017

Brittany Taylor: ‘We should all be feminists’

Student Life | Student View

By Brittany Taylor

On Saturday, Jan. 21, women’s marches took place around the globe.

The march initially began as a response to U.S. President Donald Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton and was originally set to take place in Washington, D.C.

As news of the march circulated, the movement grew larger and larger and women’s marches ended up taking place in numerous cities all over the world.

Our very own Women’s March St. John’s, that took place virtually due to unpleasant weather conditions, was joined by more than 13,000 people online.

These marches helped to transmit a powerful message and undeniably created a sense of global unification in a world that lately has otherwise appeared to seem torn.

However, not all of the public responses to these marches were positive. Since the Women’s March 2017 took place, there has been some backlash due mainly to a sense of misunderstanding as to what the marches stood for and what “feminism” itself means.

Fighting for equality

Although the march initially began as a response to Trump’s presidency, it ended up transforming into so much more than that.

It wasn’t just a response to Trump’s misogynistic comments and threats against women, but a movement to fight for women’s rights in general and equality for all.

“The Women’s March was not just composed of women, but both women and men, standing together and demanding to be treated as equals.”

As the marches grew on a global scale, so did their meaning. The marches demanded equal pay for both men and women. They fought back against oppression and sexual harassment.

The marches took place for the women who couldn’t march because they are still considered to be the “property” of their husbands or their fathers.

The marches also demanded for boys and girls to be raised the same, because it is okay for a boy to show weakness and it is okay for a girl to show strength.

The Women’s March was not just composed of women, but both women and men, standing together and demanding to be treated as equals.

Feminists don’t hate men

Following the Women’s March, different campaigns and initiatives began in order to keep the movement going.

At the Christian Dior show at Paris Couture Week on Jan. 23, models along with a number of influencers’ wore “We Should All Be Feminists” t-shirts.

The slogan paid homage to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s famous novel and speech about the importance of feminism and it’s true: we should all be feminists.

Contrary to popular belief, feminism is not about women hating men or thinking that women are superior to men.

“Feminism is inclusive to both genders and is simply the belief that men and women should be treated the same.”

Feminism is also not exclusive to females. Feminism is “a person who believes in the social, economic and political equality of the sexes.”

Meaning that feminism is inclusive to both genders and is simply the belief that men and women should be treated the same.

Steps toward a brighter future

Our society has come a long way in terms of women’s rights and gender equality, but it is clear that we still have room to improve.

If it seems to you that feminism is unnecessary in Western society today, then continue to fight for the other women in the world who have no voice at all.

If the demand for equal pay and abortion rights still have you questioning the need for feminism, then fight for the women who are sold in to slavery or the women who are victims of sex trafficking.

“Fight for the other women in the world who have no voice at all.”

Each of these issues is what the Women’s March was about. Each of these issues illustrate why we should all be feminists.

One of my favourite photographs from the Women’s March was of an older woman holding a sign that said, “I can’t believe I still have to protest this sh*t!” and I couldn’t agree more.

It’s absurd to think that in 2017 women are still begging to be treated as equals, but if everyone embraces feminism, we have the ability to change the future for everyone.


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