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Graduate student support

Faculty of Engineering creates COVID-19 relief fund for MASc. students

Campus and Community

By Jackey Locke

The Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science has established a COVID-19 Relief Fund to provide financial support to master of applied science students faced with critical financial hardships due to the global pandemic.

Dr. Faisal Khan
Dr. Faisal Khan
Photo: Rich Blenkinsopp

“We have prioritized funding for master of applied science students because many of them are experiencing exceptional challenges, and are not eligible for federal funding,” said Dr. Faisal Khan, associate dean, graduate studies, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science. “They have very limited options.”

In fact, Dr. Khan says many master of applied science students do not receive any financial support for their studies.

They are not eligible for teaching assistant positions or graduate assistantships, and many have parents who find it challenging to support them due to restrictions imposed related to the pandemic.

A one-time, non-repayable bursary of $2,500 will be awarded based on an individual’s financial need.

“We are pleased to offer this financial support to our wonderful students,” said Dr. Khan. “We will review applications carefully and decisions will be made on the approval of the dean.”

For more information about eligibility requirements and to apply, please visit the faculty’s graduate website.


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