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Pedway removal

East pedestrian overpass on St. John's campus to be demolished

Campus and Community

By Mandy Cook

The east pedestrian overpass (pedway), which spans Prince Philip Drive near R. Gushue Hall on the St. John’s campus will soon close to the public.

Both the east and west pedways are being removed in the interest of public safety.

The west pedway, which carries pedestrians from the Chemistry-Physics building to the Earth Sciences building and the University Centre, will also be removed and a new pedway will be built connecting Chemistry-Physics with the University Centre.

At 8 a.m. on Wednesday, May 18, demolition work will begin on the structure in preparation for its complete removal in early June.

During this period, the main entrance to Bowater House (Door No. 1) will be closed, but will remain as a fire exit in the event of a requirement to evacuate the building.

Pedestrians are encouraged to use the newly renovated underpass in that area. Signs are in place to direct walkers to underpass entrances.

The underpass renovations include the addition of a lift, improvements to lighting, increased tunnel width, and the addition of an open entry point to the tunnel on the north side of the parkway. The tunnel is part of an underground network called MUNnels that connect major buildings on campus.

Members of the Memorial community will be notified in the coming weeks about the temporary closure of a section of Prince Philip Drive to facilitate the removal of the pedway and the associated traffic and pedestrian detours.


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