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Staying vigilant

Campus enforcement officers trained to administer naloxone

Campus and Community

By Sandy Woolfrey-Fahey

Being prepared often comes with the hope you never have to put that preparation into practice.

That is certainly the case for Memorial’s Campus Enforcement and Patrol (CEP) officers who recently completed training to administer naloxone, which has gained mainstream recognition as it relates to fentanyl overdoses.

Once administered, naloxone blocks or reverses the effects of opioid medication.

“Like our partners in the community, it is essential to be vigilant and prepare for this drug,” said Kris Parsons, chief risk officer at Memorial.

“It is important for CEP officers to be equipped and trained in this area to the same standard as our local police force in the event an opioid overdose occurs on campus or our officers come in contact with this substance.”

The kits

Officers on duty equip themselves with a kit containing two doses and gloves.

Naloxone kits
Kits contain two doses of naloxone.
Photo: Submitted

These kits are the same kits used by the RNC and the RCMP.

If ever a situation arose requiring the use of the kits, Memorial’s CEP officers would also rely on the support of local emergency responders.

“The training has been well received by our officers, and we have also updated our security standard operating procedures to reflect the use of naloxone,” Mr. Parsons said. “We certainly do not condone illicit drug use on campus, but our priority in these situations is to assist the person in distress.”

If there is suspicion of illicit drug use or if there is a medical emergency in relation to drug use, please call 864-4100.

More information is available here.


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