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Smart investment

Humanities and Social Sciences students receive Memorial's largest undergraduate award

By Janet Harron

Two students are proving to be big winners when it comes to the 2018 Heaslip Award.

Archaeology student Molly Ingenmey, originally from Winnipeg, Man., applied for the $15,000 annual award (renewable for up to two years) at the last minute after receiving a reminder email from the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Sarah Zebak, who has family in this province but grew up in Edmonton, Alta., is studying French and Spanish and researched all possible scholarships before setting her cap for the Heaslip.

Altering course

Both women agree that receiving Memorial’s largest scholarship for undergraduate students has changed their approach to their respective degree programs.

Ms. Ingenmey can now afford to attend a zooarchaeology field course in California with the University of Utah. She is also applying to a salvage and conservation field course in Mongolia.

“I always loved history and animals — zooarchaeology is the perfect marriage of both,” she said, adding that she has previously conducted biology work in the Arctic and researched polar bears in Churchill, Man. She also volunteers in various labs on campus and is a research assistant in Memorial’s Palaeoecology, Environmental Archaeology and Timescales Laboratory. Ms. Ingenmey hopes to begin volunteering in isotope analysis labs, as well.

Ms. Zebak plans to fulfil the study abroad component of her language degree during the summer months. Growing up in a diverse community of immigrants, she hopes to become an international human rights lawyer and work with refugees.

“I figured a couple of languages would be beneficial,” said Ms. Zebak, who volunteers with the Refugee Immigrant Advisory Council and plays recreational water polo.

‘Mean comments’

Despite the availability of scholarships such as the Heaslip, both students say they have experienced push back from peers and others about studying the humanities and social sciences.

From left are Sarah Zebak and Molly Ingemney.
From left are Molly Ingenmey and Sarah Zebak.
Photo: Rich Blenkinsopp

“I get a lot of mean comments from people, from friends as well,” said Ms. Zebak. “I just remind myself that this is something I am passionate about and it is going to help me get to where I eventually want to be.”

Ms. Ingenmey, being an arts student who works in a scientific milieu, is eager to challenge people’s perceptions about studying archaeology.

“What’s even the point of doing a degree I don’t love?”

The two agree on the advice they would give to other students: get experience in other areas and take advantage of all opportunities.

“At this age we have so much freedom to try things without long-term commitments. We’re really still kids in a way!” said Ms. Zebak.

Criteria for the Heaslip

Heaslip scholarships are awarded to two students annually who are registered for full-time studies, have scholarship standing, are in financial need and have demonstrated outstanding involvement in university and/or community affairs.

They are renewable for an additional two years provided the above noted requirements continue to be demonstrated; preference is given to students in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.

In addition to this year’s winners, Heaslip renewals were given to students Lacy Custance, Danielle Day, Rebecca Ford and Aaron Pearce.


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